LAST DAY OF THE YEAR, GREAT DEALS – ALL WINES 15% OFF!

LAST DAY OF THE YEAR, GREAT DEALS
~ ALL WINES 15% OFF! ~

We might not be able to get them shipped out in time for your New Year’s Eve party, but we can ship them for your cellar!As a token of my appreciation a big THANK YOU for your support 15% OFF on ALL of our wines, TODAY ONLY!

Use the discount code
ENDOF2018
during checkout!

Red Wine Components May Help Prevent Breast Cancer Growth!

Red Wine Components May Epigenetically Help Prevent Breast Cancer Growth

Study finds proanchocyanidins and reservatrol, abundantly found in red wine, synergystically inhibit breast cancer cells while affecting epigenetic mechanisms.
By Natalie Crowley

Pink may be the color for breast cancer awareness month, but when it comes to reducing your risk for the disease; the color red makes a good choice. New research has found that certain chemicals highly concentrated in red wine may hinder breast cancer cell growth, as well as influence a person’s epigenetics.

Breast cancer has been said to be the single most important health crisis women face today. Despite advances in modern medicine, 180,000 new cases of invasive breast cancer are reported each year, along with 40,000 breast cancer-related deaths. These alarming statistics are why the search for safer, more effective prevention and treatment strategies are still needed.

In recent years, the impact of dietary components used in combination to combat cancer has gained notable interest. In particular, certain phytochemicals commonly found in red wine such as grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) and resveratrol (Res) have shown to exhibit anticancer properties. Yet, how these two chemicals affect cellular activity is not fully understood.

Based on the assumption that GSPs and Res (both found naturally in grapes) may work synergistically, scientists at the University of Alabama at Birmingham sought to examine the combined epigenetic effects that these two dietary components have on human breast cancer cells.

Several studies in the last few decades have found that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone modifications play an essential role in the development of different cancers, including breast cancer. There is also evidence that dietary phytochemicals, which are chemical compounds found naturally in plants, such as GPS and Res can affect these epigenetic changes.

While GSPs and Res are both abundant in grapes, most grapes sold for direct consumption are seedless and do not carry significant amounts of proanthocyanidins. Fortunately, red wine is produced using both grape seeds and skin, effectively maintaining the level of these beneficial compounds. Moreover, the fermentation process essentially concentrates the levels of GSPs and Res, making it more feasible to consume.

Using two different human breast cancer cell lines, the researchers in this study tested the effects of GSPs and Res on the induction of apoptosis or cell death. Their results showed that combinational treatment of the two chemicals significantly reduced cell growth compared to a singular treatment with either GSPs or Res of the same concentration.

DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) are two epigenetic mechanisms associated with cancer growth and development. Therefore to further understand the effects of these chemicals on the cell lines, the researchers analyzed both DNMT and HDAC activities using two popular commercial assay kits. Their results showed that both GSPs and Res acted as strong DNMT inhibitors as well as HDAC inhibitors. In addition, their combined effects showed a more significant reduction in DNMT and HDAC activities than did GSPs and Res alone in both of the cell lines.

Overall, the outcome from this study suggests that GSPs and Res synergistically inhibit cancer cell production by upregulating cancer suppressor genes via a reduction in DNMT and HDAC activities. While further analysis is needed to identify the specific DNMT and HDAC modifiers involved here, the findings do contribute to our understanding of these enzymes and their role in the pathology of breast cancer.

It should be noted that while this study did focus on two particular components found in red wine, it does not suggest that women should start drinking more red wine to prevent or treat breast cancer. The study does, however, highlight the potential of natural substances for the treatment of breast cancer.

As the authors stated, “It has long been believed that dietary components are easier to absorb and offer better effects in their natural form than in their purified form. One explanation is that there may be other natural compounds that are acting synergistically with the dietary component(s) of interest in their natural form. Our results lend credence to this concept.”

If you chose to drink wine, keep in mind that most health care professionals recommend women drink just one glass a day for health benefits!

Sauvignon Blanc of the Year!

Celia Welch does not need an intro, but in case you wouldn’t know who she is – She’s the brainchild (i.e. the amazing winemaker) behind the following highly rated and highly regarded wineries:   Corra, Barbour,  Keever, 2480, Kelly Fleming, Bucella, etc.).  For the past couple of years she’s been involved with a new project called Yount Ridge.  The property is based in Oakville, I know with a name of Yount Ridge, you’d think Yountville!  I was excited to taste the latest releases and was completely smitten by the wines.

Yount Ridge 2017 “Estate” Sauvignon Blanc, Napa Valley
$39.99
FREE SHIPPING on 12
Use code SHIPFREE12 during checkout

Sauvignon Musque clone lends gorgeous aromatics to this great Sauvignon Blanc. The Yount Ridge vineyard has a naturally higher acidity resulting in a fresh and vibrant wine with aromas and flavors of guava, lemongrass, citrus, peach and jasmine. The wine is medium to full in body with nicely layered flavors and the right touch of crisp acidity  A refreshing and lingering finish, balanced yet complex with never ending layers of fruit and a gentle kiss of vanilla. This is a gorgeous wine and probably one of Celia’s best whites ever!

Also check out these other great Celia Welch made wines:

YOUNT RIDGE 2015 CABERNET SAUVIGNON, OAKVILLE NAPA VALLEY
YOUNT RIDGE 2014 PROPRIETARY RED “ESTATE” OAKVILLE,  NAPA VALLEY

Click here or on the links above to order!

How Many Wine Grape Varieties Exist?

How Many Wine Grape Varieties Exist?

I became interested in what composed an often quoted 10,000 number for wine grape varieties. I was skeptical because that number was way too perfect and way too even for the total number of varieties to actually be correct. In a previous article, I point out various estimates range from 5,000 to 15,000 for wine grape varieties (including synonyms in one estimate): there is a big variance out there still.

I wanted to peek behind the curtain and see the source data. The data was in several locations and had not been unified in a format identifying all wine grape cultivars. And often cited resources is the Vitis International Variety Catalogue (VIVC) which list all grapes of all Vitis species including all crossings. But the peek behind the curtain did help to whittle down to the approximate and most accurate number but I had to create my own taxonomy of wine grape varieties which includes all Vitis species (vinifera, labrusca, aestivalis etc., and all crossings) to get the answer.  Today if you looked up on VIVC today : Vitis Vinifera Linné Subsp. Vinifera the output would be 12,893.  Voila it is not the accurate wine grape number because many entries don’t:

  • List any purpose of Vitis vinifera grape
  • Purpose is other than for vinification
  • Or lists wine grapes that most likely don’t exist like Cabernet Pfeffer (I’ll talk more about that later)

Though it may seem obvious but grapes can be utilised for the following and I have captured function/capability in my taxonomy per each cultivar if known:

  • Wine grapes
  • Table grapes
  • Raisin grapes
  • Juice (non-alcoholic)
  • Jelly/Jams
  • Rootstock

Additionally, I have started to add clones per each cultivar. Needless to say it is a taxonomy that is never finished and a very large data set to manage.

I have reviewed VIVC, Native Grapes of Italy (D’Agata), Wine Grapes (Robinson, Harding & Vouillamoz), National Grape Registry (UC Davis) and other sources as well.  I have verified 10,170+ wine grape varieties (two thirds of this is Vitis vinifera)–obviously not all are grown commercially and many are kept in agriculture collections at universities and nurseries worldwide.  There are 31,000+ synonyms or 3.1 synonyms per variety.  A nearly Senate majority 61% (or at least a Senate Majority in the old days) do not have a synonym.


This graph shows that from left is showing (no synonyms) to right the most synonyms per variety. The curve is depicting the highest number of 6k+ varieties with no synonyms to the most Pinot Noir with 334 synonyms (the last data point)

Generally, the older the variety the higher number of synonyms is likely and there probably is no surprise that Pinot Noir as an example is the number one cultivar in terms of total synonyms: 334. The creation of synonyms talks about success of variety as well as the large distribution and even the name itself in many ways begs for a translation wherever you find Pinot Noir–basically and loosely translated from the French ‘Black Pine Cone’–this can easily translate since this is a description. In the German are Blauburgunder or Spätburgunder – blue Burgundy or Spät meaning ‘late’ ripening Burgundy grape to represent Pinot Noir.  Other grape names beg for either a name change or synonyms such as the following grape names: SEYVE VILLARD 10-319, GEILWEILERHOF 69-31A- 7, or DI ROVASENDA 4/5/3–though these are a part of a series of experiments and hence the non-compelling names–obviously if these were to be readied for commercial production a more consumer friendly name would be instituted.

Complexity of wine grape prime names as well as synonyms is truly a result of history: attempts to classify wine grapes with what knowledge that was available at that time. But such an effort to help and create clarity only promoted a confused state of wine grape names and synonyms that we still live with today. Without understanding things that would only be available to us today such as DNA analysis we might think that all Trebbiano’s are all related (thank you Romans for trying).  The goal of any taxonomy system is to seek clarity, to define all components, to have reference points and to keep this tool up to date.

The wine world is vastly complex and shows things in this taxonomy that results from two major events: 1) Phylloxera 2) Scientific agriculture. Phylloxera destroyed about 2.5 mm acres of vineyards in France hence the fever pitch of creating a wine grape to withstand Phylloxera became an industry. There are a number of wine grape series of created wine grapes which are very large series say the Seyve Villard or Seibel series and other created wine grape varieties (both Vitis vinifera and Interspecific Crossings are numerous).  At a minimum there are at least 1/3 of all wine grape varieties are created. The other reason is to create grapes for both earlier ripening, disease or pest resistance, increased yield etc.

So many wine grapes have been created but will never see the light of a wine bottle. When we attempt to engineer a wine grape we often don’t have success in creating the outcomes we would like–first and foremost taste–is it compelling? Does it ripen in the time frame needed? Is it disease resistant? I point to Marselan a cross between Cabernet Sauvignon and Grenache–the aim was for a wine grape variety with a higher yield per hectare. While some of it’s end points were meet it is not the wine that people are seeking. It is not the remarkable experience that perhaps Cabernet or Grenache is on it’s own.

While we can track both prime names of varieties and synonyms and there is still confusion today. Négrette is a French grape and here is why accents are vital–the accent aigu first “é” distinguishes from the synonym names of Negrette (no accent mark on first “e”) which represent 1 Spanish, and 2 other French grapes–all unrelated Négrette.

I have not uploaded my taxonomy and could some day envision that it is crowd maintained and/or a body that adjudicates wine grape names and synonyms and even assures list is accurate with bona-fide wine grapes and add more source data on all wine grape varieties.

As I mentioned earlier the grape name of Cabernet Pfeffer is listed in VIVC but there is no source material to understand if this grape really exists. For questionable citations a taxonomy should have guide rails to keeping the documentation up-to-date. I came across a wine bottle shopping in San Francisco and was produced by Ken Volk. There is an entry in Wine Grapes book by Robinson, Harding & Vouillamoz which questions its existence. I saw one review online and it just took this variety at face value that it exists. I find it hard to believe that the name of the farmer William Pfeffer named the variety after himself and oh coincidentally it is peppery?? Seems to be a bit hokey. Kenneth Volk had DNA testing on his Cabernet Pfeffer and it was Gros Verdot (and to also clarify that Gros Verdot is not related to Petit Verdot). The TTB has Cabernet Pfeffer in its lists of accepted grape names but not Gros Verdot. Perhaps Ken Volk tried to get his wine labeled as Gros Verdot but couldn’t get it approved??  I have tried to find reference material for Cabernet Pfeffer and I cannot find any to substantiate this variety has existed in the past or if it even exists today.

While it may be a slide down an esoteric subject matter–naming and tracking the naming of wine grape varieties is important as consumers should know what they are getting. Wine grape growers should have trust in vines they purchase and plant. And winemakers should have the same assurance that the grapes they are vinifying are the grapes they purchased or grew.

If a wine producer want to buy a bottle of Gros Verdot that is much more substantiated than the mysterious Cabernet Pfeffer. After the research I completed I did not walk away a satisfied consumer of the wine I tasted. After all you wouldn’t want a Tannat when you really wanted a Pinot Noir (even through it was labeled a Pinot Noir) right?

While nation-states and organizations like the EU act in the interest of the EU it doesn’t necessarily help the entire taxonomy to have integrity over time. I could see more of an adjudicating body to help keep correct naming up-to-date.

Wine as I have always said is enjoyable to taste and yet behind the curtains is the most complex consumer product in any market anywhere. Also be certain the wine grape number I listed here will change over time as well as the number of synonyms.

What do you think about the total number of wine grapes? What do you think about integrity of naming and synonyms?

Holiday Bubbles for your end-of-the-year Parties!

The holidays are here and what better to celebrate with than some great bubblies that will not break the bank!

Normally this CHAMPAGNE SAMPLER 2018 – SIX PACK
retails for 285.00. It is yours for 259.99!

A CHAMPAGNE SAMPLER 2018 – SIX PACK SPECIAL 1 bottle each of:

CLOTILDE BRUT “GRAND-CRU” CHAMPAGNE, FRANCE
FRANCOISE BEDEL NV BRUT CHAMPAGNE “ORIGNI-ELLE”
HENRI DOSNON BRUT ROSE CHAMPAGNE
MONTHUYS CHAMPAGNE NV BRUT, 750ML
EN TIRAGE 2010 BLANC DE BLANCS, BECKSTOFFER CARNEROS
ALLIMANT LAUGNER CREMANT ROSE D’ALSACE

Also CHECK OUT THESE OTHER GREAT BUBBLIES

THIENOT ROSE CHAMPAGNE NV REIMS, FRANCE 69.99
LOUIS DE GRENELLE PLATINE CREMANT DE LOIRE 19.99
STEPHANE COQUILLETTE CARTE D’OR BRUT CHAMPAGNE 49.99
ANDRE ROBERT CHAMPAGNE BRUT “RESERVE” GRAND CRU, BLANC DE BLANCS, LE MESNIL 46.99
CAZLAS, 2009 LA CHAPELLE DU CLOS, GRAND CRU BLANC DE BLANCS CHAMPAGNE 99.99
CLOTILDE BRUT “GRAND-CRU” CHAMPAGNE, FRANCE 57.99
DIEBOLT VALLOIS CHAMPAGNE NV BRUT ROSE 59.99
MONTHUYS CHAMPAGNE NV BRUT, 750ML 35.99

Click here or on the links above to order!

MAGNUM SALE 15 – 30 % OFF OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY!!

For the holidays we are offering 15-30%% OFF ALL OF OUR MAGNUMS, INLUDING WINES SUCH AS SCARECROW, SPOTTSWOODE, PAUL LATO, ETC

PLEASE CALL US AS QUANTITIES ARE VERY LIMITED!

Item Name

RETAIL

TODAY

EXTRA DISCOUNT

Amuse Bouche 05 Merlot Magnum (not on website)

825

599.99

25%

 

CARTE BLANCHE 2015 CABERNET – 100 POINTS

349.99

299.99

 

COHO 2013 “OLD POODLE DOG” CABERNET

119.99

99.99

 

CORNERSTONE 10 NAPA AUCTION LOT CAB (GGWC EXCUSLIVE)

345

249.99

30%

 

HERMAN STORY 2015 NUTS & BOLTS SYRAH

109.99

89.99

30%

 

HERMAN STORY 2015 CASUAL ENCOUNTER GSM ,

109.99

89.99

30%

 

HOURGLASS 2010 CABERNET BLUE LINE

299.99

199.99

33%

 

INHERIT THE SHEEP 2013 CABERNET

184.99

149.99

20%

 

Leviathan 14 PR (not on website)

84.99

69.99

20%

 

MONTHUYS CHAMPAGNE BRUT NV

79.99

67.9915

 

Paul Lato 13 Grenache Ora Labora(not on website)

199.99

149.99

25%

 

PAUL LATO 2013 SYRAH IL PADRINO BIEN NACIDO 96 POINTS

249.99

199.99

20%

 

Paul Lato 13 Syrah Cinematique (Not on website)

224.99

189.99

 

PAUL LATO 2014 CHARDONNAY BELLE DE JOUR – 96 POINTS

179.99

149.99

 

PAUL LATO 2014 SYRAH CINEMATIQUE 97 POINTS

229.99

189.99

 

Paul Lato 14 Grenache Ora Labora (Not on website)

199.99

169.9915

 

PAUL LATO 2014 PINOT NOIR SEABISCUIT 95 POINTS

199.99

169.9915

 

PHARAOH MOANS 2006 SYRAH PASO ROBLES

399.99

299.99

25%

 

Sanguis 14 3 LITER Bossman (Not on Website)

399.99

299.99

25%

 

SANGUIS 2014 SYRAH “BOSSMAN” 97 POINTS

199.99

149.99

25%

 

SCARECROW 2015 CABERNET SAUVIGNON

2250

1899.99

 

SCRIBE 2010 CABERNET (SIGNED) OUTPOST EAST

175

124.99

30%

 

SPOTTSWOODE 2014 CABERNET (96+ POINTS)

399.99

299.99

25%

 

SWITCHBACK RIDGE 2014 MERLOT “ESTATE” NAPA

119.99

99.99

 

FAIT-MAIN 2015 CABERNET “TEETER-TOTTER” NAPA

120

99.99

 

TEXTBOOK 2013 CABERNET “MISE EN PLACE” OAKVILLE (SIGNED)

139.99

109.99

 

ZIATA 2012 CABERNET FRANC OAKVILLE (SIGNED)

150

109.99

30%

 

San Francisco’s Restaurants Still Outclass New York!

The Bay Area dominates the Michelin three-star category.

Let the cross-continent sniping begin!

By  Kate Krader, Bloomberg

Alteier Crenn

San Francisco has been fighting to be the top fine dining city in the country. And it keeps winning.

Michelin put its weight behind the West Coast again. The storied guide awarded three stars to eight restaurants; two were upgraded, including Single Thread, the exquisite farm-focused, Asian-accented restaurant and inn from chef Kyle Connaughton, which is barely two years old. That’s an almost unheard of accolade for such a youngster—Michelin usually takes years to upgrade, or downgrade, any venue. Atelier Crenn, from the visionary chef Dominique Crenn, also emerged thrice victorious.

At Single Thread, preparations with Japanese influences earned three stars.
Photographer: Eric Wolfinger

For anyone keeping track of the San Francisco vs. New York restaurant battle, the Big Apple is falling further behind. New York has just five Michelin three-star dining rooms. That trend accelerated last year, when New York lost a three-star restaurant, Jean Georges, and San Francisco gained one, Coi, the time-honored modernist spot in North Beach. One reason San Francisco has such momentum is the relative freshness of their top places: In 2007, San Francisco had just one Michelin three-star  restaurant, the French Laundry. Few of the other destinations were even open yet. By contrast New York’s youngest three-star, Chef’s Table at Brooklyn Fare, opened in 2009.

Michelin’s international director, Gwendal Poullennec, believes San Francisco’s star power will keep rising. “The quality of local product that chefs are working with is incredible. There has been a consistent rise in quality, the trend is quite positive. That has manifested in eight three-star restaurants.”

The news wasn’t rosy for all Bay Area restaurants, however: Coi fell back to two stars. And one of San Francisco’s long-standing and beloved spots, the one star Terra, closed earlier this year.

Quince Restaurant stays atop Michelin’s list.
Photographer: Aya Brackett

Be forewarned, though: Those Bay Area three-star meals do not come cheap. The establishments in the top realm offer only set menus. Atelier Crenn’s is $335; wine pairings begin at $220. At Quince, the regular tasting menu is $275; wine pairings are an extra $250 and the eight-course white truffle menu is $595. At Saison, the menu starts at $298. By comparison, New York’s Le Bernardin offers a prix fixe menu starting at $160.

San Francisco does have a cash-packed audience for these high end restaurants—in October, Bloomberg reported that wages grew more in the tech hub than anywhere else in the country (3.9 percent, compared with 3 percent for poor old New York City.)

There are now 57 restaurants in the Bay Area with Michelin stars. Last year, that number was 55. Five new places were awarded one star this year, including the new wine-focused Bar Crenn. (For those looking for a big winner on the list, her name is Crenn.) Another new entry is Protégé, with an elegant, caviar-laden menu from French Laundry alums, located in Palo Alto. Poullennec notes this is a trend among new Michelin-starred spots: they’re being run by veterans of three star places, meaning they have a clear path into the firmament.

Victor’s almonds with avocado and caviar from the acclaimed Restaurant at Meadowood.
Photographer: Kelly Puleio

Poullennec hesitates to start a Michelin food fight between New York and San Francisco, however. He notes the breadth of the Bay Area region, which encompasses wine country and Silicon Valley, is much bigger than New York.

While there’s been buzz about an impending restaurant apocalypse in pricey coastal cities, at least one Bay Area player calls it an overblown concern. Michael Tusk, chef-owner of the Italian dining room Quince, cited his wife’s recent experience as a supporting anecdote. “Lindsay recently met with a local health inspector, who told her that the department experienced a 35 percent increase in applications for restaurant openings in 2018. This data supports my sense that the San Francisco restaurant scene is continuing to experience expansion.”

Still, for those on a budget, Michelin recently announced the Bay Area’s Bib Gourmand list: 68 places, including 8 new ones, were recognized for their high-quality, reasonably priced food (specifically, $40 for two courses plus wine or dessert). Whether all the places meet that criteria, especially in a city like the Bay Area, is another story.

Here are this year’s Michelin winners. The 2019 San Francisco guide will go on sale Dec. 4. (An asterisk denotes a new entry; neighborhoods are designated by Michelin.)

Birdsong, the modern American spot, is new to the list.
Photographer: Heather Lockwood

Three Stars

  • *Atelier Crenn, San Francisco
  • Benu, San Francisco
  • The French Laundry, Yountville
  • Manresa, Los Gatos
  • Quince, San Francisco
  • The Restaurant at Meadowood, St. Helena
  • Saison, San Francisco
  • * Single Thread, Sonoma County

Two Stars

  • Acquerello, San Francisco
  • Baumé, Palo Alto
  • Californios, Mission
  • *Coi, San Francisco
  • Commis, Oakland
  • Lazy Bear, San Francisco
Inside the ultra stylish Bar Crenn.
Source: Bar Crenn

One Star

  • Al’s Place, San Francisco Mission
  • Aster, San Francisco Mission
  • Auberge du Soleil, Rutherford
  • *Bar Crenn, San Francisco
  • *Birdsong, San Francisco
  • Bouchon, Yountville
  • Campton Place, San Francisco
  • Chez TJ, Mountain View
  • Commonwealth, San Francisco
  • Farmhouse Inn & Restaurant, Forestville
  • Gary Danko, San Francisco
  • Hashiri, San Francisco
  • In Situ, San Francisco
  • Ju-ni, San Francisco
  • Keiko à Nob Hill, San Francisco
Inside the high-powered winery Kenzo sits the eponymous Japanese restaurant.​​​​​
Source: Kenzo
  • Kenzo, Wine Country
  • Kin Khao, San Francisco
  • Kinjo, San Francisco
  • La Toque, Napa
  • Lord Stanley, San Francisco
  • Luce, San Francisco
  • *Madcap, Marin
  • Madera, Peninsula, Menlo Park
  • Madrona Manor, Wine Country
  • Michael Mina, San Francisco
  • Mister Jiu’s, San Francisco
  • Mourad, San Francisco
  • *Nico, San Francisco
  • Octavia, San Francisco
  • Omakase, San Francisco
  • Plumed Horse, South Bay
  • The Progress, San Francisco
  • *Protégé, South Bay, Palo Alto
  • Rasa, Peninsula, Burlingame
Sarah Rich, chef and co-owner of Rich Table.
Photographer: Kassie Borreson
  • Rich Table, San Francisco
  • Sons & Daughters, San Francisco
  • SPQR, San Francisco
  • Spruce, San Francisco
  • State Bird Provisions, San Francisco
  • Sushi Yoshizumi, Peninsula
  • The Village Pub, Peninsula
  • Wako, San Francisco
  • Wakuriya, Peninsula

Drink wine with Eric Clapton, Robert Plant, and Jackson Pollock…

The wrath of Juno sent Aeneas wandering the Mediterranean in Vergil’s Aeneid. For the ancient Romans, ira or wrath, was a tool of a god, an unstoppable anger driven by forces greater than man. One can argue that we see such fury in both the might of nature and the passion of art. Wrath appears in the edgy power of Robert Plant’s voice and the raw wail of Eric Clapton’s guitar. It is frozen into Jackson Pollock’s violent splatters of paint. Wrath is in the wall of maritime fog that rolls into the Salinas Valley and the relentless afternoon winds that scream through our grape trellises.

Wrath 2016 Pinot Noir, Boekenoogen Santa Lucia Highlands
GGWC 49.99

FREE SHIPPING on 6
Use code SHIPFREE6 during checkout

Winery Notes: “A lively palate, capped by wild berries and minerals, displays bright acidity, floral notes and a lengthy finish.”

94 Points Vinous: “Vivid ruby. A highly perfumed bouquet evokes ripe red and dark berries, vanilla and candied flowers, along with smoky mineral and allspice overtones. Shows very good depth and clarity on the palate, offering sappy black raspberry, cherry cola and spicecake flavors firmed by a spine of juicy acidity. Closes with repeating spiciness, interwoven tannins and impressive, red-fruit-dominated persistence.”

Click here or on the links above to order!

96 Point “GORGEOUS” under $35.00 Petite Sirah

 

A British couple settled in the hills of Mendocino where they found  land with schist-like Cote–Rotie soils on a windblown cool mountaintop overlooking the Pacific Ocean, which would become their “estate” vineyard.   With the assistance of Justin Smith (Saxum), Crole Meredith  & Steve Lagier (Lagier-Meredith), Mike Officer (Carlisle) and Wells Guthrie (Copain) they set out to plant what has become a much regarded Rhone-varietal vineyard.  Wells helped develop and maintain the vineyard.  Under the tutelage of the great Roar winemaker (Scott Shapley) they have put some very good quality and well-priced wines on the wine map!

Halcon 2016 Petite Sirah “Tierra”
GGWC 32.99
FREE SHIPPING on 12 or more
Use code SHIPFREE12 during checkout

Deep rich ruby color. Nose of graphite and black fruits. Silky smooth mouthfeel, flavors of black plum, black cherry and roasted meats. A supple, well balanced wine. Fermented and aged in neutral French oak puncheons with native yeast and 50% whole cluster. Bottled unfined and unfiltered.

96 Points by Jeb Dunnuck (formerly of Robert Parker): “The 2016 Petite Sirah Tierra Theopolis Vineyard is another straight up fabulous wine from Paul Gordon. Its deep ruby/purple color is followed by gorgeous notes of black raspberries, lavender, flowers, and honeysuckle. Perfumed, elegant and already surprisingly forward, it still packs tons of fruit and richness on the palate, with vibrant acidity and a great finish.”

Click here or on the links above to order!

Inaugural 2 Barrel Napa Cabernet Star is born!

The first grapes were planted in the 1880’s, and the vineyard continuously farmed until Prohibition. Mike Yates’ family purchased the property in 1950, and Mike took over farming of the property in 1995, and began selective replanting in 1999. The vineyard is carefully tended by Mike and his daughters Whitney and Mary.

Vintone winemaker
Sean Foster

Vintone 2015 Cabernet “Yates Family” Mount Veeder, Napa Valley
GGWC 124.99
FREE SHIPPING on 4 or more!
Use code SHIPFREE4 during checkout

The 2015 Vintone “Yates Family” Cabernet is made of 100% Cabernet Sauvignon, that was aged 24 months in 50% neutral and 50% new (tight grain, light toast) French oak.  The deep garnet-purple colored 2015 Cabernet Sauvignon Yates Vineyard has a beautifully scented aroma of bright violets and chocolate with hints of cassis, blackberry compote, a whiff of tobacco and vanilla. The full-bodied palate is loaded with lush blackstone fruit, somewaht firm and solidly structured with ripe, silky grained tannins supporting the aromatic layers.  The wine has good 30 second finish.  Well done for a first release!

Click here or on the links above to order!